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actionjacksonlovesbbq:

I wish more cartoons taught young girls that if a man harasses you or annoys you or whatever you should blow him up with a bazooka and feel no remorse :)))

(Source: positivelycrippled, via regilord)

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dduane:

WANT.
(from the fall/winter 2014 Le Monde d’Hermès magazine: “447140HA11: Crew-neck sweater in khaki cashmere with spider embroidery”.)

dduane:

WANT.

(from the fall/winter 2014 Le Monde d’Hermès magazine: “447140HA11: Crew-neck sweater in khaki cashmere with spider embroidery”.)

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countblue:

Jack-O-Lantern with Ball Python

(via dysanic)

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spcsnaptags:

wolvensnothere:

kurtiswiebe:

This perfectly summarizes why I love the Simpsons and hate Family Guy. 

Yup.

So this.

I watched that episode with my family and I could just feel how uncomfortable everyone was. Honestly, it was a really jarring, unpleasant episode.

Homer is a terrible dad. So is Peter. But Homer’s saving grace has always been that he tries—he’s bad at it and he fucks it up a lot, but he loves his family and he wants to be better than he is.

One of my favorite Homer moments is in “Diatribe of a Mad Housewife.” Tl;dr Marge writes a steamy romance novel starring herself and Ned, and when Homer finds out, he chases down Ned and, rather than attack him, asks him to teach him how to be a better husband.

There’s some part of his stupid self that wants to do better.

I never got that impression with Peter. Instead, the family has gotten more and more abusive towards Meg. It’s really unsettling for me when I started realizing that’s what happens sometimes in abusive families. Abusers sometimes single out one child to abuse, and quite often the other family members take the abuser’s side. After all, it’s easier to side with an abuser than to run the risk of becoming the target yourself.

There’s never really a point where it seems like Peter cares at all that his shitty behavior impacts his family. It actually seems to have gotten worse over the years. He expects everyone to clean up his messes because that’s always what happens; there’s really no reason for him not to be shitty.

And it’s easy to see how Meg is affected. She doesn’t have much of a character, really, because so much her screen time is devoted to being abused. The bits of character development all seem to hinge on her being this sad, neglected person who’s trying her best but never really gets any help from anyone. Quite the opposite; there have been a lot of episodes where her family sabotages any attempts to be herself.

It can be easy to forget how awful this behavior is when the only context is the show itself (frankly, everyone on Family Guy is kind of terrible). Seeing it played against the Simpsons, who are a flawed and dysfunctional but ultimately loving family, was painful to watch.

(Source: fyspringfield.com, via regilord)

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dduane:

via starry-eyed-wolfchild:

A town known as the “town of books”, Hay-on-Wye is located on the Welsh / English border in the United Kingdom and is a bibliophile’s sanctuary.

One of my favorite places in the world. Last time we were there with the car, we came back with the trunk so full of books that we nearly ruined the shocks. It was glorious.

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"

October “Toby” Daye was in many ways my first “real” protagonist. She was complicated, she was sad, she was bruised and refusing to break, and she was not afraid to put her duty ahead of her desire to be liked. She bullied her way through the world she was created to inhabit, looking at every complication that stood in her way and saying “No, you move.” After a lifetime spent moving dolls through stories, it was like I finally had a real person to follow and document. I started writing her adventures, and sending them out to people I trusted to read and review. Midway through either the second or the third book—I don’t remember anymore—I got a note from one of my proofers saying “You can’t have Toby do this, she’s always been a little bitchy, but this makes her a total bitch. No one will like her if she does this.”

I panicked. I couldn’t write a series about an unlikeable character! I’d never get published, no one else would ever meet my imaginary friends, and everything I’d worked for my whole life would be over, all because Toby was unlikeable.

Then I took a deep breath, and wrote back to the proofer requesting that they do a find/replace on the .doc, and plug in the name “Harry Dresden” for every instance of “October Daye.” They did, and lo and behold, what had been “bitchy” and “inappropriate” was suddenly “bold” and “assertive.” A male character in the same situation, with the same background, taking the same actions, was completely in the right, justified, and draped with glory. He was a hero. Toby? Toby was an unlikeable bitch.

The proofer withdrew the compliant. I have never forgotten it.

"

seanan_mcguire: Characters, criteria, and causation: where the problem lies. (via helavik)

(via dduane)

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dysanic:

"You’ll always be [identity you’ve rejected] to me" is a shitty sentiment and I don’t understand why some people think it’s a sweet thing to say

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(Source: memewhore, via regilord)

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restlesslyaspiring:

mundosdepapel:

meret118:

List of British words not widely used in the United States.

Lists of words having different meanings in American and British English.

List of American words not widely used in the United Kingdom.

OH MY FUCKING GOD. THANK YOU

FINALLY

(via dysanic)

Tags: ooo neat words
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megachikorita:

some kid in my class wrote an essay about how it never explicitly says Beowulf isn’t a robot

(via ursulavernon)